Sculpting Your Own Horse

April 6, 2018

 

1. Your horse as a model 

Using your own horse as a model can be a great exercise to develop your eye and improve your quiet observation skills. Sculpting your own horse will help you better understand him or her as an individual and will give you access to a model that you can interact with as needed during your sculpting session. 

 

 

 

 

Learn to sculpt your horse with our Online Intro Sculpting Course. Register Today! 

 

 

 

 

2. Setup 

Make sure you set up your sculptors stand (download how to build a sculptor's stand now) out of reach from your horse. You will want your horse to go about his usual business to capture his most natural pose. Setting up too close often results in the horse nudging you or your sculpture and turning your sculpting session into rubs and loves for your horse rather then progressing in your work. Rubs and loves are great but should be after you've accomplished your sculpting session goals. So set up out of reach. 

 

 

 

 

3. Capturing the spirit of your horse

In your notebook write down a few words that describe the personality of your horse. This is your opportunity to personify him a bit. If he was a character of a movie or a book who would he be? How does he handle emotions? etc. This is where you build the story you want to tell about your horse. Keep it honest and true to the observations you've made of him in previous sessions. Pairing this with your emotion free observations, you will dive deep into the hearts of those who view your sculpture. 

 

 

 

 

4. Observation 

Using the free observation worksheet provided to you by Sculpture Equine Anatomy you will have a great starting point for composition. While you are sculpting, continue to apply your observation skills but instead of writing notes put them into your sculpture. Not literally of course. Just, go through the observation questions in your mind while you are sculpting and observing your horse and choose the appropriate actions or movements that apply to the pose and emotion you want to express through your sculpture.

 

 

 

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